Saturday, 3 January 2015

NET Cancer awareness nails


Today's post is inspired by the logo and slogan for NET Cancer day.  The post itself may be quite wordy and long, please feel free just to jump to the nails.  In a nutshell, this type of cancer has recently hit way too close to home.

Screenshot of NET Cancer day website 


NET (neuroendocrine tumour) is an umbrella term for several types of cancer including a specific type, Carcinoid.  Last month my husband was diagnosed with Carcinoid.  When the doctor says "cancer" for a moment the world stops turning and you feel sick.  The sickness doesn't go, but the world continues to turn.  The word cancer stays with you through every waking and sleeping minute and you can't shake off the fear and worry.  We are fortunate that we have an excellent GP who has really helped us both and taken time to explain things to us. 

The background on this one: hubs has had stomach issues for some time and been told he has IBS and diverticulitis.  To be fair he probably has both of these.  

Last July he was hospitalised with very bad pains, at one point it was suspected appendicitis and he had severe vomiting.  After many episodes of sickness (my step son was a godsend: at one point as I was out in the corridor heaving and he was in the room moving bowls!) and 36 hours in hospital the pain and problems seemed to clear and he was discharged.  In October there was an exact repeat of the earlier stay, but more investigations were carried out, which included some CT scans.  

We went away the second time and alarmed by the vomiting, and afraid of eating normally, hubs had a radical change in his eating habits, eating mainly toast as it was light and didn't cause any pains after he had eaten.  He lost four stone in weight over two months, but he did have the weight to lose and he didn't look ill.  In fact, he was in the best health he has been for many years and felt pretty good when a call came.  The CT scans had been reviewed and he needed to go the hospital.  NOW.  Luckily I was off work, I went with him and we were told the CT scans had been reviewed and this growth had been spotted.  The symptoms he had presented with twice that year were caused by a blockage.  The blockage is the Carcinoid causing a narrowing.

The specialist advised us the type of cancer was very slow growing, so slow growing he could well have had it already for up to five years but from their initial scans it should be curable with an operation to remove the affected section of his bowel.  In fact he is due to go for tests a couple of days from now, which will formulate the plan of action for the specialist.

I have read a lot about Carcinoid and NETs since.  When I found the NET Cancer Day website with the image shown above I knew I had to do some nails relating to their logo, it was the first interest I had had in nails following his diagnosis.  

I wanted to do this mani for a couple reasons: to explain why my blogging will become sporadic, nails and blogging are the absolute lowest on the scale of importance to me right now and to try but also, more importantly, to raise awareness of this type of cancer.

The motto "if you don't suspect it, you can't detect it" and the zebra logo relate to a medical reference which is something like this: if you hear the sound of hooves clip clopping down the street you would probably presume it is a horse and on most occasions  you would probably be right, however remember it could be a zebra as  they are a lot like a horse.  But not a horse.   Carcinoid tumours symptomatically present so similarly to IBS, I guess we are lucky that the specialist thought zebra and reviewed those CT scans further.

This was the mani I thought of after reading information at the NET Cancer Day website and seeing their logo and the colours.



I used Barry M matte polishes in Espresso (previously provided for review) and Rhosilli, OPI My Boyfriend Scales Walls and stamped with Konad Black polish and Bundle Monster plate BM 223.  The studs were from Born Pretty Store (previously provided for review) and whislt the purple shade looked close to Rhossili, I actually painted them with two coats of Rhossili and left them to dry about half an hour ahead of doing this mani.  The first set of photos are shown with topcoat, I initally used Beauty UK UltraGloss top coat because it doesn't streak, then topped with INM Out the Door for drying speed.



The next photo was taken before I topcoated the black nails, I actually really liked it both matte and shiny!


As I wasn't happy with the ribbon nail so I removed it and wore this mani with the zebra pattern over Rhossili instead,  I accidentally deleted the "proper" camera and light box photo by accident, so I took a phone pic as an alternative.


Please send lots of positivity our way as both hubs and I will benefit from as much support as possible.

If you are interested in reading more about NET you can visit the MacMillan pageNET Cancer Day website or for personal experiences of diagnosis, treatment and living with this, Ronny Allen has an excellent blog which I promptly subscribed to. Hubs has said that coming out of this he may consider starting a blog as a way of sharing his experiences. If he does, I will update this post.
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14 comments:

  1. Ohh Emma, I am so sorry to hear this. I can't imagine what you're feeling or the strain that this is putting on you and your family. This is a beautiful manicure to bring awareness to this. Take as much time as you need. Stay strong!

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    1. Thanks, it's a tough journey but everyone has been so supportive :)

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  2. Sending lots of positive thoughts to you and your husband.

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  3. Emma, I am very sorry to hear this - wishing you all the best

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  4. Sending you lots of love and strnegth - it sounds very good news that they think it is easy to operate. xx

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    1. Yes, if it is as small as they think (the full picture will be seen after the tests) then it will "just" be a key hole op too.

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  5. I'm so sorry to hear this Emma, thinking of you and your family. What a great way to spread awareness about this x

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  6. *huge hugs* Sending positive thoughts to you and your hubby. Hope the operation will be scheduled soon and go well!

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    1. Thanks Brethil. Fingers crossed it is soon, straight forward and simple.

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  7. best of luck with your treatment Emma, I'll watch your blog for updates, keep in touch.

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    1. Thanks for reading this Ronny and taking the time to comment. Your blog was one of the sites I found that day we were told and I immediately subscribed. The description of how you were diagnosed by chance as the nurse undertook extra checks after hearing you had lost weight is proof that medical professionals need to think zebra. If Lee had been discharged a second time with out further investigation he could have been back in with same problem again by now.

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